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Playing around with Kamut, Millet, and Peperonata

 

 

Kamut and Peperonata
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Prep Time
40 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 40 min
Prep Time
40 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 40 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup raw Kamut
  2. 1 tbs minced shallot
  3. 2tsp minced garlic
  4. salt and pepper
  5. 3 tbs olive oil
  6. 6 cups vegetable stock
  7. 1 yellow bell pepper sliced
  8. 1 red bell pepper sliced
  9. 1 large fresh onion sliced
  10. 1 tbs finely minced garlic
  11. 3 tbs olive oil
  12. 1tsp chili flakes
  13. salt and pepper
  14. 1 cup of loosely packed fresh basil
Instructions
  1. Soak the Kamut in hot water for about one hour.
  2. Rinse.
  3. Place olive oil, shallots, and garlic in a pan.  Heat.  when it starts to sizzle, add the Kamut.  Toast for about a minute stirring constantly.  Add one cup of broth and let absorb slowly.  Add stock until done.  The grain will never overcook, which is great for a potluck or a dinner party you are going to.
  4. While your Kamut is slowly cooking,
  5. place sliced onions, garlic, olive oil, and chili flakes in a large enough pot to hold all of your bell peppers.  Heat, and when your onions start sizzling add the basil.
  6. Cook until the onions are tender.  Add the bell peppers. Cook until tender.
  7. Combine the peppers with the Kamut.  I added a few black beans for color.
  8. Add some olive oil to make it shiny and because you can never have too much olive oil.
Notes
  1. Kamut has a nice chewy texture.
A Vegan Chef in San Gimignano http://tuscanvegan.com/
Hello from Tuscany!

It is a holiday weekend here in Italy, June 2nd is the Italian Republic’s birthday.  And yesterday our little nation turned 70!

It is a rainy weekend, and a lot of customers have, unfortunately, cancelled their hotel reservation.  On the bright side, I have more time to experiment in the kitchen.  I played around with ideas yesterday and made several dishes, including one with Kamut and one with Millet.  I made Kamut with one of my favorite things to eat: Peperonata, which is another one of those multipurpose easy dishes.  So versatile that you can use it as a pasta condiment, a side dish, or puree it and use it as a dip, or a spread.

Kamut is a grain which contains gluten, similarly to Spelt, its gluten is more water soluble than the gluten in wheat and the reason it makes it is more digestible.  I personally prefer spelt.  But I thought I would give this ancient grain one more try.  One of my vegan customers tonight loved it.  Keep in mind that Kamut takes a very long time to cook.  It took me over an hour.  I did it as I would a risotto.  Perhaps it would have been better to pre-soak it for one night and then boil it.

It is amazing how simple food can be so delicious.  Try this easy recipe and let me know what you think. (you can use cold pasta, rice, spelt, quinoa, or anything you want)

So here is the recipe:

 

1 cup raw Kamut

1 tbs minced shallot

2tsp minced garlic

salt and pepper

3 tbs olive oil

6 cups vegetable stock

1 yellow bell pepper sliced

1 red bell pepper sliced

1 large fresh onion sliced

1 tbs finely minced garlic

3 tbs olive oil

1tsp chili flakes

salt and pepper

1 cup of loosely packed fresh basil

 

Soak the Kamut in hot water for about one hour.

Rinse.

Place olive oil, shallots, and garlic in a pan.  Heat.  when it starts to sizzle, add the Kamut.  Toast for about a minute stirring constantly.  Add one cup of broth and let absorb slowly.  Add stock until done.  The grain will never overcook, which is great for a potluck or a dinner party you are going to.

IMG_1649

While your Kamut is slowly cooking,

place sliced onions, garlic, olive oil, and chili flakes in a large enough pot to hold all of your bell peppers.  Heat, and when your onions start sizzling add the basil.

IMG_1599

Cook until the onions are tender.  Add the bell peppers. Cook until tender.

 

Combine the peppers with the Kamut.  I added a few black beans for color.

Add some olive oil to make it shiny and because you can never have too much olive oil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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